The Beerists Podcast – Episode 7 – The Blind Leading The Blind

The_Beerists_Podcast_-_Episode_7_-_The_Blind_Leading_the_Blind.mp3

Episode 7 – The Blind Leading the Blind

This week, we each poured two mystery beers for the rest of us to ‘blind’ taste. None of us knew what the others brought over for this mad experiment. The results made for a hugely surprising, fun show.

Oh, and I’m not posting the beers we drank on the show this week, or the quazi-rankings we rattled off. You’ll just have to go into it as blind as we were.

The Beerists are: John Rubio, Anastacia Kelly, and Grant Davis. With Mike Lambert.

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No show notes this week.

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Theme music provided by Defalated Ballon.

Some of the music provided tonight from Mevio’s Music Alley. Check it out at music.mevio.com

    2 Comments

  1. 2012/06/13 at 16:01

    Fun show guys, I enjoyed listening to it. Whoever guessed that DeKoninck was Fat Tire was very close, since both are Belgian Ambers, and in fact DeKoninck was at least a partial inspiration for FT. I think the fact that Beer Advocate has DeKoninck listed as a Belgian Pale is a bit of a misnomer, since it’s clearly an amber (BA has no Belgian Amber style listed so my guess is they got as close as they could). Either way, good work on the show, I look forward to future episodes.

    -Chris

    • John Rubio (Author)
      2012/06/15 at 15:34

      Thanks, Chris.

      I guess that’s the whole issue with style designations- they’re: a) Not flexible enough to keep up with the dynamic fluidity of brewing innovation; and b) So rapidly becoming so granular as to make staying current an exhausting proposition. Some brewers are in favor of eliminating style classifications altogether, and to switch to a more descriptor-based marketing (as in “wheat beer brewed with belgian yeast and peaches”). I’m not really sure where I stand (aside from being frequently wrong).

      Thanks for the clarification. And thanks for listening!
      -Rubio